Dallas Love Field robots are watching passengers, checking for masks and loitering cars – YouTube

The 7-foot tall kiosks called SCOT use artificial intelligence to detect passenger behavior, give audible warnings and can even call police or security.

Dallas Love Field robots are watching passengers, checking for masks and loitering cars – YouTube
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Android Visual Voice Mail App Vulnerability Allows Eavesdropping

Visual Voice Mail vulnerability

A researcher has recently disclosed a severe vulnerability in the Visual Voice Mail app affecting Android users. As per his findings, exploiting the vulnerability allows eavesdropping of voice messages. However, the bug report currently has a disputed status as the telecom giants refused to acknowledge it.

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How to Make Sure No One Is Tracking You With an AirTag

Apple’s AirTags and Samsung’s SmartTags this year joined an already crowded Bluetooth tracker market. These little devices attach to key rings, backpacks, and luggage or can be tucked inside a bag or attached to any other possession you’re afraid to lose, sending you alerts when it leaves your side and even enabling you to track down its last known location on a map.

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Log4j: Just How Screwed Are We?

A vulnerability in a widely used Apache library has caused Internet-wide chaos—and the trouble may just be starting.

Well, it’s certainly been a year for cyber debacles, so, sure, why not tie things off with a nice, fat security vulnerability that affects almost everything on the internet? That sounds about right.

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I found an Amazon folder with thousands of audio recordings from my home gadgets

Tiktok user @my.data.not.yours requested her personal data from Amazon and was shocked by the data they had recorded form her Echo Dots.
Tiktok user @my.data.not.yours requested her personal data from Amazon and was shocked by the data it had recorded from her Echo Dots.

A woman was shocked to discover just how much data Amazon has collected about her.

She posted a viral TikTok video explaining how she requested to see the data but wasn’t expecting to receive so much.

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‘It’s Very Much a Rigged Game’: How a Video Game Called ‘Dot’s Home’ Highlights Discriminatory Housing Policies in the U.S.

This is a dope concept!

Can people be enlightened about housing inequality through a video game? That’s the purpose of Dot’s Home — a video game whose purpose is just that.

The narrative-driven game centers around Dorothea “Dot” Hawkins, a 20-year-old Black woman who goes back in time to help different generations of her family make decisions about housing. Dot time travels via a magic key to the ‘50s, ‘90s, 2010s, and then 2021, Input Magazine reported. 

Dot is living in her grandma’s rundown house, located in a disinvested Black neighborhood in Detroit. Dot travels back in time to help; for example, her grandparents decide if they should invest in a fixer-upper as their first home. In another scene, Dot must help her parents decide if they should move away from their community to the suburbs after their public housing home is set for demolition, Bloomberg reported.

Dot travels through different decades, each highlighting “a defining moment in history for Black homeownership: the Great Migration of the 20th century, urban renewal efforts in the 1990s, and finally, the 2010 foreclosure crisis that helped spur gentrification,” Bloomberg reports, At each stop Dot must transverse racist housing policies and predatory lending practices. Ultimately, the game proves the odds are stacked up against Dot from creating generational wealth, no matter what decade she is in and the decisions she makes.

The American dream myth is that wealth and prosperity is out there for everyone’s taking, and that the house with the white picket fence is accessible to all. But players in Dot’s Game are shown the obstacles faced by Black homebuyers in the U.S.

“We wanted players to play the game and not necessarily empathize with Dot’s family but just to bear witness to, and accompany them through, these very intimate but consequential moments,” Christina Rosales, housing and land director at the community organizing nonprofit PowerSwitch Action and a co-producer of the game, told Bloomberg.

“As a player, you might feel like you have the choice to change the course of the future for this family, but ultimately, you don’t. It’s very much a rigged game. You get what you get,” Rosales told Kotaku.

The focus of Dot’s Home is to illustrate how Blacks, as well as other minorities, have to deal with housing issues, food insecurity and environmental risks, among other issues.

The concept for the game was developed through the Rise-Home Stories Project, an organization composed of Black and minority organizers that includes game designers, writers, activists and others. The group’s mission is to “change our [the] relationship to land, home, and race, by transforming the stories we tell about them,” according to its website.

Dot’s Home, which was released in late-October, and is free to play on Steam, Itch.io, Google Play and Apple’s App Store.