‘Look at My Young Black Kings’: Three Brothers Create All-Natural Vegan Frozen Pops Inspired By Black Culture

This is so dope… good biz young men!

 

Amid a pandemic, a civil rights reckoning, and the heat of the Los Angeles summer, three young brothers are helping to cool the place down with a hip-hop-inspired healthy frozen pop business that donates a portion of its proceeds to charity.  

The brothers, 10-year-old Shiloh, 12-year-old Judah, and 14-year-old Nas Accius, started Jiggy Popp with the idea of introducing a healthy treat to their community. Through their all-natural-ingredient products, the boys aim to provide an accessible gateway to a vegan lifestyle while also giving back. Shiloh, Judah and Nas plan to donate a portion of their proceeds.

The boys’ musical backgrounds influenced their decision to donate their money to inner-city arts programs. The Fernando Pullum Arts Center in Leimert Park, where the boys often vend, is one of the chief recipients of nearly $6000 the boys have contributed so far.  

“It’s not only about just having access to art programs, it’s beyond that. It’s more about having a creative mindset and creative solutions,” Judah explained. “But for that to happen, people need to be creative. That’s where the idea popped in: Why not give back to arts programs. They help children, so why not help them help children.”  

Crediting music with enabling them to start their business in the first place, these lifelong musicians have infused their products with some hip-hop culture.

“Before, I was a street performer. I was bussing on the streets, I was playing my guitar,” explained eldest brother Nas. The money he earned there, matched by a gift from the trio’s dad, made up the $700 start-up cost for Jiggy Popp. Everything else, including the names of the pops, was the result of collaboration.  

“The flavors for our pops are Black culture-related,” Judah explained.  “We have things like Mango Unchained – Django Unchained – like the movie. We have Strawberry Better 23, like Strawberry Letter 23, which is a Prince song,” he pointed out. Other flavors like Georgia Peach on my Mind, Blackberry Gordy and Tropic Like it’s Hot are also a nod to Black culture.

One expert says that what these young men are doing is not only important for development but vital for the Black community. Will Campbell, professor of Entrepreneurship at Southern University and VP of Commercial Services and Mortgage Retail at Essential Federal Credit Union, pointed out the alarming wealth gap between black and white families. “Entrepreneurship is the only way we’re going to make up the wealth gap.” He added, “Creating those entrepreneurs with very innovative, creative, and bright minds. Training that mindset at an early age will help them develop that financial responsibility. It teaches stewardship early.”

The boys understand and accept their collective responsibility. “When people buy our pops it’s not just about more money,” Judah said.  “Most people we encounter are like ‘look at my young black kings out here hustling’. I feel like I’m inspiring people.” 

Each boy has hopes for the future of their business and their community. Shiloh hopes the business will grow and people will share it with their friends. Nas can’t help but think about a potential reality — that they may never have to work a 9 to 5.  “Once this is fully sustainable, this could be our life,” he said. “If I had to say what we wanted to do when we grow up, it’s this business.” 

Meanwhile, Judah hopes to continue to inspire people. “Every other kid could do this as well,” he pointed out. “I want to inspire people to be able to do what we do: Have their own company and thrive the way that we have. Moving forward I want to keep inspiring people.”  

‘Look at My Young Black Kings’: Three Brothers Create All-Natural Vegan Frozen Pops Inspired By Black Culture

Get Caught Up On New Africa August’s Opening Weekend! | How We Buy Black

This sounds good

New Africa August has arrived and if you missed the opening weekend, you missed quite a bit. If you haven’t registered yet, you can do so now by clicking here. As for what you missed over the weekend, we’ve got your recap right here. Continue reading

DAME DASH WAS RIGHT | EP # 214 feat Blueprint & Illogic

We recently realized that it’s been five years since Dame Dash’s iconic interview on The Breakfast Club. In this interview he introduced the hip-hop world to several concepts and philosophies that are routinely ignored by large media platforms like entrepreneurship, ownership mentality, sticking together, and hustling for your last name so your children can have it better than you did. Although he was met with a lot of initial resistance for his approach and blunt honesty, time has revealed the truth in his words. In this episode we discuss how Dame Dash was right all along. Continue reading

What I don’t understand…

what i don’t understand is why “we” keep expecting fairness and justice on stolen land and think “we” can beg our oppressors into doin “what is right” by us….

we know there are separate laws & treatment for “us” and “them”, so why do we kept acting surprised and taken aback when shit goes left for us…. “we” know “they” want to get rid of us if they can’t profit off of us in some kind of way….

the “system” isn’t designed to benefit “us” so why do “we” kept expecting to integrate into a broken system and fix it from the insides…. u either gonna bow down or get laid down….

why do “we” trust “their” directives when time and time again, they fuck us over…. why do “we” even listen to them at all? is it because “they” taught “us” to not trust each other and to believe in a deity in “their” image to put themselves subliminally as superior in “our” heads? Even when most of “their” esoteric knowledge was taught or stolen from “our” ancestors and used to empower themselves….

Do “we” think dressing like “them” , looking like “them” or buying “their” brand labeled goods will endear them to “us” and make them like us just a little more? Or is imitation the best form of flattery and submission?

if u didn’t know, “we” ran this mudball at one time…. and some of “us” were not kind beneficent rulers…. tyrants even… and this is the key to why “we” have no friends…. no one wants us back on top of things….

“we” are “their” enemy…

Black Owned Companies With Disinfectant & Cleaners To Fight COVID-19

Alternatives to Lysol and all that…

Cleaning and disinfecting is literally a life and death matter now. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed everything, including how often and with what we clean our homes. While many stores are sold out of basic cleaning products, here are seven Black owned companies that will help you to stretch your dollar and give you the peace of mind you need. Continue reading

Government Refuses To Purchase Masks From Black Owned Company | How We Buy Black

Ground zero for COVID-19 is Chicago’s Cook County Jail. Hundreds of detainees and at least 200 correctional officers are currently infected. Prisoners, guards and other first responders in Chicago are without personal protection equipment (PPE)– gloves, masks and the like — making the situation even more deadly. People are dying, even though a Black owned company in Illinois literally has millions of masks available. The city, county and state refuse to talk to the owner.
Continue reading

U.S. Supreme Court Hinders Comedian-Businessman’s Race-Bias Suit Against Comcast – The New York Times

This was some BS….. they will not let one of “us” get a mass media outlet without being compromised.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday threw out a lower court’s ruling that had given the green light to comedian-turned-media entrepreneur Byron Allen’s $20 billion racial bias lawsuit against Comcast Corp that accused the cable television operator of discriminating against black-owned channels. Continue reading