How The 1919 Chicago Race Riot Created Black Street Gangs

It’s a reason gangs started in Chicago….

On Sunday, the highly-anticipated HBO series Watchmen set the internet ablaze with America’s shocked reactions to a little-known incident frequently called the Tulsa Race Riots. The bombing of Black Wall Street is common knowledge to a large percentage of black folks (we’ve written about it at least 20 times, including here, here and here), but apparently it’s news to a lot of people who prefer a whitewashed, sanitized version of American history. Continue reading

“The favela (slum) is a field of extermination of black people,” says Rio-based community leader

All ghettos and favelas are designed to kill us off without most of the public noticing…. as in Brazil as it is in AmeriKKKa….

When I first starting researching the history of brothers and sisters in Brazil at the end of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st, I honestly thought titles of books by the great Abdias do Nascimento such as Brazil: Mixture or Massacre or The Genocide of the black Brazilian were exaggerations. Now, nearly two decades later, I see these books as the grim prognosis of a reality that has been in the works for more than a century. The more I dig, the more I find evidence that the extinction of the black Brazilian is an ongoing work in progress. Continue reading

Mercedes-Benz sued for discrimination, overcharging African American customers

Not surprised in the least…

LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WTHR) – A former sales manager at a Mercedes-Benz dealership in Lafayette is now suing the business for racial discrimination.

The lawsuit against his former employer alleges he was “fired in retaliation for complaining about the owner’s repeated use of the N-word, including boasting about systematically overcharging African American customers for vehicles, referring to it as ‘n***er scalping.'” Continue reading

8 Successful and Aspiring Black Communities Destroyed by White Neighbors

After all the hubbub about the Watchmen series premiere and it’s depiction of the Tulsa Black Wall Street Massacre, I figured folks needed to know it and Rosewood were not isolated events….

Atlanta Race Riot (1906)

When the Civil War ended, African-Americans in Atlanta began entering the realm of politics, establishing businesses and gaining notoriety as a social class. Increasing tensions between Black wage-workers and the white elite began to grow and ill-feelings were further exacerbated when Blacks gained more civil rights, including the right to vote. Continue reading

Philadelphia Pulls 72 Cops Off the Street Over Racist, Sexist and Violent Social Media Posts

I know personally Philly PD ain’t shit….

The Philadelphia Police Department has taken 72 officers off the street because of social media posts described as racist, sexist, and violent. They were recently revealed by a watchdog group that reviewed thousands of posts from police officers around the country. Errol Barnett reports.

via Philadelphia Pulls 72 Cops Off the Street Over Racist, Sexist and Violent Social Media Posts – Black Main Street

How Argentina Killed Millions of Her African Population To Become A Purely Caucasian Nation

This has happened wherever YT has gone…

The history of the world can never be told completely without giving concise and credible accounts of slavery of Africans. Over 50 million Africans were taken into slavery in America and Europe, while over 12.5 million were taken into slavery in the Arab world.

Of the over 50 million that survived the “middle passage” on ships to America and Europe, tens of millions of them found themselves in Brazil. Today, it is a known fact that roughly half of Brazil can trace their lineage directly to Africa. Continue reading

Coding While Black: Black Tech Professionals Share

I ain’t been corporate in over a decade but I definetly saw a lot of this… even with my “light skin” privilege…. and why I am not surprised the Nigerian claims racism hasn’t affected him while noting racists events…smmfh

“Until my tenure at Twitter, I strongly resisted being ‘the Black guy,’” writes Mark S. Luckie, an author, digital strategist, and former Twitter employee. “I didn’t want to be the sole representative of a multifaceted group of people or be siloed into focusing on Black issues.” Continue reading