Loyalty No Royalty, The Breakup Of Tony! Toni! Ton’e! Full Documentary W/ Out takes

Always wondered what happened with them….

LTNFF Winner for Best Documentary Loyalty No Royalty, the untold story of the break up of the legendary R&B band from Oakland, CA. The trio, in fact began as a six member band in 1988 and successfully climbed the charts into the late 1990’s. Unfortunately greed fueled mistrust and eventually the demise of the original band. EXTRA CREDITS TO SOUL TRAIN AND SHOWTIME AT THE APOLLO. Soundtrack and 3TOB single is available on ambitiousrecords.net
Contact info for Elijah Baker email eb3lev@gmail.com / for booking 510-578-3766 /Instagram Elijah_Eb_baker / ambitiousrecords / Facebook Elijah EB Baker / Ambitious Records

via Loyalty No Royalty, The Breakup Of Tony! Toni! Ton’e! Full Documentary W/ Out takes – YouTube

The Untold Story of Ill Al Scratch

I thought they were decent 1 hit wonders lol

Ill & Al Skratch had the summer of 93 in a choke hold with their infectious smash hit ” I’ll take her and where the homiez”.The Brooklyn Uptown connection after that dropped the Album Creep with me . Only to be bamboozled by their Production company and Label. Not Until now have their story been told. This is a story of persistence and determination. The Ups and Downs of the Business should never deter you if you destine to win.
Created, Written and Produced by James “Kraze” Billings

via TRB2HH present|The Untold Story of Ill Al Scratch – YouTube

World Supreme Hip Hop – The Freshco & Miz Story

I used to like the one single I remember “We Don’t Play”

This is the story of two young perfectionists from distant cites who once won the World Rap and DJ contests in the same year and then joined forces. Re-live their rise to Hip Hop fame and see how they impacted the culture before suddenly disappearing from the music scene in the mid 90s. Continue reading

The Art Of Warez on Vimeo

This brings back so many memories…

Early internet users communicated with each other via Bulletin Board Systems, or BBS. Popular in the 1980s and early 1990s, these digital hubs allowed users to dial-up on a modem and chat on public message boards or through private chats, play text-based games, and even transfer files, from computer art to cracked software.

Pirated software, known as “warez,” was accompanied by ANSI art—a form of flashy hacker graffiti that credited the software crackers responsible for providing the illicit files. Eventually, ANSI art became its own subculture, with computer artists competing to develop new fonts and imagery in all its 8-bit glory.

A new documentary, The Art of Warez, directed by artist and filmmaker Oliver Payne in collaboration with one-time ANSI artist Kevin Bouton-Scott, dives into this world of warez and ANSI art. Payne told Motherboard that he met Bouton-Scott while teaching a course on video games at ArtCenter in Pasadena, California. The former ANSI artist schooled Payne on warez and ANSI subculture.

“Whilst graffiti exists illegally on private and public property, ANSI originally existed on (and to take credit for) illegally pirated software,” Payne said. “As they are criminal activities, both require anonymity and the use of a tag name to achieve notoriety within the scene. The best artists create fresh fonts using crazy color combinations and go hard to make as many dope ANSIs as they can. It’s totally hacker graffiti and the folk art movement of the proto cyber crime scene.”

Bouton-Scott said that ANSI art still feels mysterious to him after all these years. A graffiti artist as a kid, his transition into the ANSI scene felt completely natural to him.

“We were all completely obsessed with this stuff, going to enormous lengths to make the artwork and get the art packs together, trying to get good reviews in the electronic magazines that would write about all the latest work,” Bouton Scott said.

Payne thinks it’s remarkable that something so cool could remain virtually unknown. Bouton-Scott noted that many ANSI artists, who were also into coding and making VGA graphics and demos, later became graphic designers and likely influenced the look of the early web.

“As youth subcultures go, this might be the best one,” Payne said. “It combines so many wonderful things—hacking, video games, graffiti, freedom of information, fantasy art, mecha anime, anarchist literature, comic book monsters, [phone] phreaking.”

Bouton-Scott said the digital archivist Jason Scott, who works for the Internet Archive, teamed up with RaD MaN, founder of the ANSI group ACiD, to create a database of the art packs that still existed in the early 2000s. They are now available for download on Scott’s website, textfiles.com.

For Bouton-Scott, the ANSI scene has no contemporary parallel. But if there were one, he believes it would be comprised of teenagers, as social media for “creative adults” is dominated by entrepreneurialism, branding, and self-commodification.

“The ANSI scene was quite the opposite of this,” said Bouton-Scott. “It was a self-contained labor of love, pro-crime, anti-copyright, facilitating the very real need of free-software for young computer users.”

The Art of Warez, produced by safecrackers x somesuch, premieres online today (July 31) at SafeCrackers.

via The Art Of Warez on Vimeo

The Listening: The Story Behind Little Brother’s Debut Album

Started in a college dorm room by a group of North Carolina Central students in 2001, the Justus League collective and offshoot trio Little Brother defined the sound of Durham hip-hop for years to come, constructing a style altogether distinct from everything to the north and south. This level of innovation turned heads with some of hip-hop’s biggest names, and the members of Little Brother (9th Wonder, Big Pooh and Phonte) have gone on to work with superstars like Kanye West, Kendrick Lamar, Drake, Jay-Z, Dr. Dre and Questlove, who appears in the documentary. Continue reading

BBS the Documentary [Full HD]

Where I started my online adventures… the precursor to the modern internet….

The BBS (bulletin board system) scene of the 80s and 90s was a magical time. Long before the Internet escaped from the lab, connected the planet and redefined what it meant to use a computer there was a brave and pioneering band of computer users who spent their time, money and sanity setting up their home computers and phone lines to welcome anyone who called. Continue reading

The Lightbulb Conspiracy – Planned Obsolescence

Things break by design these days….

Did you know that the lifetime of light bulbs have been reduced on purpose to just 1000 hours?
Or that your printer may ‘break’ after a predefined number of printed pages determined by an electronic counter?
Or that Apple batteries lasted only 18 months which meant that you had to throw away your iPods and buy another?
What about Dupont stockings that were strong enough to tow a car, before they went back to design a stocking that would wear out more quickly!

Continue reading

Kodak Black vs T.I./ The Notre Dame Fire/ play Hip-Hop Government Game

Yanadameen Godcast season 2, episode #013

In today’s episode of The Yanadameen Godcast with Lord Jamar and Rahh Digga, the co-hosts discuss current events. They speak on the T.I. and Kodak Black’s beef, and debate about the fire that happened in Notre Dame. They also play a “Hip-Hop government” game. Continue reading